Racquetball Betting – Learn Racquetball http://www.learnracquetball.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:25:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.learnracquetball.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/learn-racquetball-icon-150x150.png Racquetball Betting – Learn Racquetball http://www.learnracquetball.com/ 32 32 Ruppert Jones talks karate and third bridge at Kingdome, Claudell Washington https://www.learnracquetball.com/ruppert-jones-talks-karate-and-third-bridge-at-kingdome-claudell-washington/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:25:23 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/ruppert-jones-talks-karate-and-third-bridge-at-kingdome-claudell-washington/

The first player selected in the 1976 Major League Baseball expansion draft by the new Seattle Mariners organization, Ruppert Jones quickly made his mark on the new franchise. A multi-talented athlete with power and speed, Jones became the Mariner’s first rep at the MLB All-Star Game in 1977.

In 1979, he posted the best single-season stats of his entire career when he recorded 166 hits, scored 109 points, had nine triples, produced 78 points and stole 33 goals while playing in all 162 games.

After brief stops with the New York Yankees and a second All-Star appearance while playing for the San Diego Padres, Jones became World Series champion in 1984 with the Detroit Tigers. He also spent three years with the California Angels before ending his career in Japan.

In our latest Q&A Card Back, we catch up with the retired player and current author on getting into karate to help him out on the baseball field, hitting bombs in Seattle’s Kingdome, and how good a teammate is. by Claudell Washington was really awesome.

Tony Reid-Your 1987 Topps card stated that you enjoyed both karate and racquetball. Are those two activities that you really excelled at during your playing days?

Ruppert Jones-I didn’t play racquetball after I broke my shoulder in 1980. I stopped playing racquetball. I did karate. The two best seasons I have had in baseball, 1979 and 1982, I took up karate in the offseason. I have had my best seasons in the past two years, without a doubt.

TR-Was it the speed, timing, and hand-eye coordination in karate that helped you out on the diamond?

RJ– That was the concentration aspect of it. It was the aspect of me that really controlled my body. It was about uniting my mind to my body. I was able to go out and do that on the pitch much better.

TR-Your Topps card from 1980 stated that you were the fifth player in Kingdome history to reach the third deck with a bomb. It was 7/11/79. Do you remember hitting that moon stroke?

RJ– He was a Yankees pitcher named Ken Clay. Yeah, I hit one in the third deck. I’ll tell you what, if you look at the records and history of the Kingdome, I bet you in the right field there weren’t that many balls hit in the second bridge. I hit one in the second deck. It had to be a line reader. You couldn’t get one other than with a line reader. The second bridge was a real narrow slit. If you look at the history, I guarantee that there weren’t more than four or five balls hit in that second bridge.

TRThe back of your 1988 scorecard stated that you were a three-star sports star as a baseball outfielder, basketball goalie and football wide receiver. He also mentions the fact that you were a teammate with Claudell Washington. That’s a pretty cool fact, considering you’ve both had long careers in Major League Baseball.

RJ– I’m from Texas. In 1967 my family moved to Berkeley, California. It was in summer. I didn’t play baseball that year, but the following year, 1968, I was playing baseball on the sand court. A guy I played basketball with saw me play. He said I was a better baseball player than a basketball player. I told him the only reason I played basketball was because they didn’t have a football team. He told me they had Pony League trials. He told me to come but not to do anything. He told me to sign my name and he told me not to run or throw or do anything. He said his team won the championship and chose the last one. If the other teams saw me, they would pick me up. OK, so I went to the trials. I signed up and didn’t do anything. His team chose me. The first day we trained the team coach saw me play. He said he didn’t normally draft guys he didn’t know anything about. He said he heard I was good, but he didn’t know I was that good.

Then I played against Claudell Washington. I was 13 years old. He was by far the best player in the league. I’ll tell you how good he was. I played against him when I was 13 and 14. Claudell did not play baseball from 14 to 17 years old. We had a Connie Mack team that year and we needed players. We asked Claudell to play for us. He said okay. He hadn’t played baseball for a few years. He got out and a month later signed a free agent deal with the Oakland A’s. He goes to Oregon and kills the league. Then he goes to the Midwest League and kills the league. Then he goes to Double A and by the All Star break in Double A, the Oakland A brings him into the big leagues. So he goes 17 and at 19 he was in the big leagues after not playing baseball for three years. In two years, he was in the big leagues. That’s how good Claudell Washington was.

On Tony reid

Since his childhood Tony has been a huge sports fan. If he could play sports, watch sports and talk about sports, it was a beautiful day. As soon as he was drawn to sports, Tony was drawn to collecting sports cards. Not much has changed over the years. He collects CRs from star baseball, basketball and football players. He also has a soft spot for early autographs from MMA stars. If you want to tell Tony about the greatness of Michael Jordan, Bo Jackson, or Ken Griffey, Jr., you can reach him at @reidrattlecage on any social media platform.

]]>
Community Kindness Countdown to Christmas: These teachers inspired and motivated us to aim for the stars https://www.learnracquetball.com/community-kindness-countdown-to-christmas-these-teachers-inspired-and-motivated-us-to-aim-for-the-stars/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 16:37:42 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/community-kindness-countdown-to-christmas-these-teachers-inspired-and-motivated-us-to-aim-for-the-stars/ Frank Piccolo, Larry Bobbie and Skip Bailey were the three friends of Korah Collegiate in the 1970s

So far these profiles have all focused on some great people who are still hanging out and living here with us. I need to write about three people who have impacted my life in a very influential and positive way, and so here is their posthumous story.

Perhaps the greatest of all professions is that of teaching. No one except our parents can have as much influence on a life as a good teacher can. I have to tell you the story of three of the greatest, three of the best, three teachers that I will always remember. I call them the Three Amigos because they were also the best friends in the world.

Yes, that’s the legend of Frank Piccolo, Larry Bobbie and Skip Bailey, three Korah Collegiate teachers in the 1970s. Frank was a chemistry teacher, Larry was a guidance counselor, and Skip was a biology teacher. All three had graduated from Teachers’ School around the same time, all three were relatively young beginners, fresh and energetic in the craft, and all three were masters at their craft.

Larry was my badminton coach (he produced a ton of provincial level players), and he guided me through those crazy high school years, Frank and Skip taught me several classes during the high school period, and all of them. the three of them became my friends after high school. graduation from school. The saddest thing about their story is that all three died relatively young, and long before they were done giving of themselves to the people of this planet. I miss them all dearly.

The Three Amigos were the core of Koré’s teaching staff at the time. And you had to remember Korah was a tough West End school in the ’70s. It wasn’t the shining star she is today with the Baccalaureate curriculum, all the star sports programs, and the academic ratings. which dominate the region. The children of Bayview, the farming community of Prince and Baseline Township, the Gros Cap gang, and children of working-class parents made up the role of the students. They were difficult children, and Kore’s teachers had their work cut out for us to keep us on the right path.

And the Three Amigos, the three fools you might call them, knew what they had to do. They loved these difficult students in their care and they showed their love with dedication, empathy and compassion to all of us. If that meant dressing up as rock stars for the Christmas gig, and hammering on electric guitars and syncing lyrics to KISS tracks, then that’s what they did. The children have gone mad. I liked them. Encouraged them like real rock stars.

If that meant planning a huge day off in the middle of winter to give us a huge winter carnival, with teams competing in winter games on snow, ice and hardwood, then this is what they and the other teachers would do. These guys put on the aprons and ran the barbecue canteen that fed eleven hundred kids’ sausages and hot dogs at these special events.

And if that meant sitting one-on-one with a kid who was struggling with the concept of the periodic table in chemistry, or how a bullfrog’s digestive system works, then they would provide the extra help needed. This is exactly what they did. They took care of each student in their charge.

Their classes were extremely entertaining and I truly believe they set up their classroom as a stage production that they rehearsed and prepared well in advance. Engaging, lively and fun to experience comes to mind. Can you imagine a fun chemistry or biology class? These guys could get away with it.

And to really get to know the students for whom they are responsible, they are all involved in sports training. You see kids on a whole new level when you train them, and these guys were so generous with their time and commitment to the children of Korah.

Larry will perhaps stay in my mind as the greatest high school coach who ever lived. He got into badminton and these hardened young people out of the west, and he created athletes who competed at the Ontario level. Regardless of the city championships and NOSSA, we wanted to participate in OFSAA. He brought us there with a love and knowledge of the game, and a love for us.

When I attended teachers college, our teachers and instructors always told us, no matter what the pedagogy and learning here, you will all teach the same as your favorite teachers in your days at school. I tried to model their behavior and their way of being in my own years as a teacher. I hope I was able to get out of it.

And so I mention these Three Amigos because I know that we all have teachers in our lives who have inspired and motivated us to reach for the stars, or to reach for the heavens, or to reach anything.

These guys did it for me, and I’m forever grateful to them.

I guess in hindsight, with the help and generous spirit of Frank, Larry, Skip, and their fellow teachers, Korah Collegiate was truly a shining star in the early 1970s.

And I’d bet that up there somewhere in the other world, Frank kicks Skip’s ass at racquetball, Skip brags that he really won the game, and Larry advises them both. get along and work together as a team.

It was the best team. Thank you gentlemen.

I hope your families all have a blessed and joyful Christmas, and know that the three of you are right next to them.

Your student and your friend, Frank O’Connor

Frank O’Connor and his wife Gail own and operate Voyageur Lodge and Cookhouse in Batchawana Bay. He writes one profile daily through December 24, featuring people who have given back to their community in a positive way through their good deeds and hard work.

Source link

]]>
‘I will continue to do this forever’: Athletes thrive on US senior circuit | Athletics https://www.learnracquetball.com/i-will-continue-to-do-this-forever-athletes-thrive-on-us-senior-circuit-athletics/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 10:37:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/i-will-continue-to-do-this-forever-athletes-thrive-on-us-senior-circuit-athletics/

TThe story of Kathy Bergen’s decorated athletic career began in the pages of AARP magazine, which is another way of saying it didn’t start until after she turned 50. In the years that followed, Bergen cemented his legendary status in the world of masters track and field, which is open to competitors aged 35 and over. She was inducted into the United States Masters Track and Field Hall of Fame in 2008 and was named the 2015 Best Female Masters Athlete. Earlier this month, at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla. Bergen received its highest honor, since it was named the best. USATF Master Athlete of the Year.

Honors are deserved for someone who has broken so many world records that she loses count. “Heads up, I think 24, 28. I’m not really sure,” Bergen said in a phone interview. (It’s 28, but who matters?)

“In the last 12 years, I’ve broken so many records, it’s crazy,” she added.

Bergen, who turns 82 on Christmas Eve, set five more world records last year. She set three indoor records in an event in Houston, posting times of 10.02 in the 60m and 35.66 in the 200m, as well as a record of 1.2m in the high jump. Months later, at an event in Marble Falls, TX, Bergen was there again, setting a pair of outdoor world records in the 100m with a time of 16.62 seconds and in the jump. height with a jump of 1.15 meters. She broke two more outdoor world records this year at an event in Santa Ana, Calif. In June, improving her time in the 100m to 16.26 and setting a new mark in the 200m with a time of 35.34. Bergen has seen many of her previous world records drop, but she still holds the best indoor times in the 60m (9.21) and 200m (31.86) for the 70-74 age group, which it established in 2010 and 2012, respectively. His world indoor high jump record for the 75-79 age group, 1.25 meters, has been held for more than five years.

Whether Bergen was able to compete with the 2020 pandemic was something of his own. She thanks her husband Bert, with whom she has five children and 13 grandchildren, for finding the two events amid all the disruption.

It was Bert who played a similar role almost 30 years ago, when he helped guide Kathy to her first meeting. She was 54 and Bert was 56 – or, as Kathy puts it, “that old age when you start getting AARP magazine.” Bert, who was a high school high jumper, came across an article promoting the California Senior Games, which were to be held near Occidental College.. “He said, ‘Why don’t you try? Anyone can run, ”recalls Kathy.

Until then, Kathy’s athletic experience was limited. She tried her hand at intramural basketball and volleyball while growing up in Brooklyn, but her athletic endeavors stopped after high school. And although Bergen said she was always fast as a child, and that she became a successful tennis player after she and Bert moved to California in 1972, her background didn’t exactly bode well for a future in the world. Hall of fame. It also didn’t give her a reason to expect immediate success when she took her first steps on the Occidental track.

Bergen won the 50m and 100m races that day – from a standing start and in a pair of sneakers, no less – and from there she was gone. “It was like, oh boy, I found a new love,” Bergen said.

She learned to use starting blocks and bought a pair of sprint spikes, as she and Bert looked for other competitions in California. Kathy eventually demonstrated her dominance in other events, adding the 200m, high jump and javelin to her repertoire.

There are late sportsmen – Ian Wright played Sunday League football until he was 21, Hakeem Olajuwon started basketball at 15 – and then there are athletes like Bergen, who started collecting gold medals when most of their peers counted gray hair. “When I was 70, I was spinning my wheels,” she said. “I was fine. I would win quite a bit, but I wasn’t that good. Not content with just placing first, Bergen enlisted the help of a track coach named Eric Dixon. “I have to admit I thought she was crazy at first because when we first met she told me she wanted to set world records,” Dixon said. “But I’m always up for a challenge. Besides, I saw that she had the right attitude. He developed a training program for Bergen, who said the new diet had helped make it world-class. Dixon coaches other masters record holders and some notable collegiate athletes, but he said few rivals Bergen. “Kathy is at the top of my list,” he said.

There are other top athletes out there who unlocked their elite abilities into adulthood. Brian Hankerson discovered his hidden athletic prowess when trying to help his children discover theirs. Driven by a father’s impulse to lead by example, Hankerson, 45 at the time, began training with his son and daughter as they competed in track and field. “I would run with them and cheer them on. “Hey, if I can do it, so can you,” Hankerson said.

Attending a regional meetup in the Miami area around this time, Hankerson noted some contemporaries who were not there as spectators. “We called them ‘masters’. I had never heard of it, but listening to the age groups, I was like, ‘Wow these guys are my age,’ he said. “I was out there running with my kids and I was like, ‘I bet I could do what they’re doing.'”

He tried it the following year by participating in the high jump and the sprint. During a meeting in Clermont, Fla., Another contestant admitted that Hankerson was a rough diamond. “He asked me if I had ever tried the long jump,” Hankerson said. “I told him no, and he said that with my jumping ability and my speed, I could be great in the long jump.”

Hankerson, now 62, has established himself as one of the senior long and high jumpers on the senior circuit. He will compete at the Masters World Championships in Finland next summer and intends to set his first world records in the coming year. Hankerson is currently on the cusp of breaking the long jump (6.07 meters) and high jump (1.78 meters) records for the 60-64 age group. “These records are definitely doable,” he said.

Hankerson set a number of senior National Games records, billed as “the world’s largest multi-sport event for seniors.” The 2022 games, postponed for a year due to the pandemic, will take place in Hankerson’s hometown of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Where he and Bergen will be joined by thousands of other athletes over 50 competing in 20 different sports.

Philipp Djang will be there. He has missed only one edition of the senior games since 2005, racking up more than 20 event records in swimming races in four age groups. Djang, 67, swam as a child in New Mexico, where he still lives, and had what he described as a “mediocre” college career in the pool at a small Oregon college. He remained in shape throughout his 35-year career as a scientist in the United States Army, playing racquetball and competing in triathlons and marathons, but had largely given up swimming until 1999, when he was 45 years old and a friend persuaded him to participate in a competition. held in Long Beach, California. “I got in the pool, swam a race and accidentally broke a world record,” said Djang, modestly referring to his time of 1: 03.39 in the 100m backstroke. “I had no expectation at all of doing something like this.”

This performance was the springboard for a swimming career marked by 10 individual world records and 15 American masters records. The success gave Djang a rosy view of the natural aging process. Every five offers a new age group to conquer – and new records to target. “I can’t wait to grow old,” he said. This is why Djang was particularly disgusted to miss a year of competition in 2020, his 65th birthday falling shortly before the pandemic. “I would have done really well, but it all stopped,” Djang said. “You are only 65 once.”

Bergen admits her record breaking days are likely over in the 80-84 age group, but that doesn’t mean she’s done making history. Just last month, Julia Hawkins, 105, set a world record in the 100m with a time of 1: 02.95, perhaps offering a glimpse of what awaits Bergen, who swears she will “will continue to do this forever.”

But Bergen’s career prompts an obvious question: Does she ever wonder what might have been if she had realized her abilities earlier in life? After all, a high jump trainer once told her that if she had started in high school, she might have been an Olympian. “I am very flattered by his estimate,” she said. “But if I had, I wouldn’t be doing it now.”

Source link

]]> St. Cloud man tries to beat his own world record https://www.learnracquetball.com/st-cloud-man-tries-to-beat-his-own-world-record/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 13:52:23 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/st-cloud-man-tries-to-beat-his-own-world-record/

Two men from St. Cloud will attempt to break their own world record on December 30 at St. Cloud Cathedral High School.

Last year, Ben Bzdok and his brother Matt Bzdok set the Guinness World Record for “Consecutive Greatest Ultimate Flying Disc (Frisbee) by a pair of 2,944 passes”. This year Ben has a new partner and is set to break the record he helped set. Ben shared:

My brother-in-law Greg Jamison and I will be in a basketball gym this year to provide more space for our business. The goal is 10,000, but we would be happy with anything north of 5,000. Matt Bzdok and I currently hold the record at 2,944, but Matt was unable to re-commit this. year, so Greg was happy to take his place.

When Ben set this record last year, he had three goals in mind: to promote the maintenance of good health, to promote exercise, and to bring attention to the St. Cloud State Ultimate Frisbee team. University.

This year’s attempt will take place on a basketball court as opposed to a racquetball court, but the settings are the same. They should be consecutive Frisbee shots from more than 10 feet apart. Ben said:

Matt and I know we could have put it a lot higher without the skinny walls of the racquetball court. It will be a real test of endurance and Greg is an endurance athlete!

The world record attempt will take place on December 30 at Cathedral High School gymnasium from noon to 10 p.m. or until they hit their goal of over 5,000.

10 strange Guinness World Records set in Minnesota or by Minnesotans

Cool Guinness World Records set in Minnesota or by Minnesotans

Still looking for Christmas stockings? Here are over 30 amazing ideas

Source link

]]>
Life Time bet big on pickleball https://www.learnracquetball.com/life-time-bet-big-on-pickleball/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 15:25:27 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/life-time-bet-big-on-pickleball/

Five years ago, convincing Life Time to open its tennis courts to a regional pickleball tournament was no easy task.

“We begged Life Time in Lakeville to use the tennis courts to sponsor a regional pickleball tournament,” recalled Frank Stucki, president of the Twin Cities Pickleball Club. Life Time gave in and the tournament was a huge success. “We had people from all over the country, we had 500 participants. “

Since then, sport has exploded. The USA Pickleball Association estimates there are more than 5 million players, an increase of 34% since 2017. And Life Time, based in Chanhassen, already one of the largest providers of indoor tennis in America. North, aims to become the largest operator of indoor tennis. pickleball courts around the country.

In early 2022, Life Time will open its first pickleball-focused club, a redesign of the former Bloomington North Fitness Center on 84th Street. This will follow the recent opening of new pickleball courts at Life Time clubs in Eden Prairie, Lakeville, White Bear Lake and St. Louis Park. Across the country, Life Time track clubs currently have nearly 200 pickleball courts, and that number will soon double, said Dan DeBaun, senior public relations specialist for Life Time.

Pickleball combines elements of racquetball, table tennis and regular tennis. It is played with a solid paddle and a hard plastic ball similar to a Wiffle ball. The court is about a third the size of a tennis court, which tends to make pickleball more accessible to older participants. But it also develops rapidly in adolescents and young adults.

“It’s easy to learn and grow and improve,” said Liam Halloran, a 14-year-old pickleball enthusiast from Excelsior. “You don’t have to spend that much time pickleball to have fun and feel good enough at it.”

Twin Cities Pickleball has seen its numbers rejuvenate. “At the very beginning, the average player was between 60 and 70 years old,” Stucki said. “And now we’re reaching the young executives, the 20’s and 30’s, and hopefully we get into the Junior Olympics.”

Given its broad appeal – the average pickleball player is 43.5 – Life Time began promoting the sport over the summer. “It’s appealing to all ages,” DeBaun said.

Life Time Bloomington North Pickleball Club

Scheduled to open in early 2022, Life Time Bloomington’s Pickleball Club will be equipped with five competition-level courts, a dedicated viewing area, bar and lounge area.

The push towards pickleball will not diminish Life Time’s interest in indoor tennis. “Pickleball makes perfect sense as an addition to our list of existing racquet sports,” said DeBaun. “As an introductory racquet sport, pickleball will only benefit tennis by attracting more players.”

Life Time has competition from boutique pickleball clubs.

The Lucky Shots Pickleball Club in Minneapolis is “all pickleball, all the time,” the tagline says. With 12 pickleball courts, avid players can participate in open play and reserve playing time. The Picklebarn, which opens next year in Mankato, is a 27,000 square foot pickleball tournament facility with eight land.

The Picklebarn plans to offer leagues, lessons, drills, walk-in games, lessons, private events and regional tournaments to “shed light on this awesome sport,” said Mitchell Elofson, co- founder with his wife Sidney. “We want everyone to feel welcome when they come in to play, whether they’re a seasoned veteran or picking up the paddle for the first time. We will offer something for all types of players.

Are pickleball centers the new bowling alley? “There’s a lot more land opening up in the Midwest,” said Laura Gainor, spokesperson for USA Pickleball. “It’s actually a vibrant market right now for all those entertainment venues that want to set up indoor courts with a bar or restaurant attached to them, giving more people the opportunity to play. “

The growing enthusiasm for the sport is creating a secondary market for pickleball accessories. You will now find a pickleball section in the sports department of most Target stores. “They come out with more clothes, more paddles, more gear,” Gainor said. “Brands like Franklin partner with professional players and sponsor tournaments, so just a wide variety of growth opportunities.”

Over the summer, Life Time hosted the Pro Pickleball Association’s Orange County Cup at their club Rancho San Clemente in California. It drew thousands of spectators and TV coverage, DeBaun said.

It’s not a fad, say pickleball enthusiasts and business owners.

“I absolutely believe it will be an Olympic sport. Besides being a fun sport to play, it’s a great sport for spectators, ”said Stucki. “It’s a real social game, but now it’s moving from social to competitive to commercial enterprise.”

Source link

]]>
Around the Neighborhoods: Gusserane to Raheen https://www.learnracquetball.com/around-the-neighborhoods-gusserane-to-raheen/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/around-the-neighborhoods-gusserane-to-raheen/

GUSSERANE

all alley

The newly appointed Gusserane Racquetball Committee has been busy updating the lighting system in the ball lane in recent weeks. Brighter, more energy efficient lights are now in place and the place is good to go.

A registration evening will take place on Tuesday 30 from 8:30 p.m. in the alley and anyone interested in using this facility in the coming months is invited to register. Membership is € 55 for players and € 25 for non-players.

Members of the community whose days of play are behind them but who would like to see the fairway flourish can join the non-playing members. The committee also intends to organize a Christmas raffle to offset the cost of the new lights. Your support for this fundraising in the coming months would therefore be welcome.

Christmas bakery

The St Louis daycare now takes orders for the Christmas pastry. Order your Mince Pies, Christmas Pudding and Christmas Cakes. The deadline for orders is December 13th. Call 051-389509 or call the Center to place your order.

They will be holding a Christmas bakery fair on Saturday, December 18, 2021 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the nursery. All Covid restrictions will be in place and social distancing will comply with government guidelines.

Craft Fair

The Campile room committee is organizing a Christmas craft fair on Sunday December 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Electronic code Y34DT10.

Many crafts will be offered that day. They also organize a Christmas raffle in conjunction with the craft fair with a 1st prize of € 200 in cash and a 2nd prize a Christmas basket worth € 100 and many other prizes to be won. Tickets are on sale from Committee members and the draw will take place at the Crafts Fair. This week’s jackpot is € 2,900.

GAA club AGM

The Gusserane GAA club will hold its annual general meeting on December 28. Members are requested to forward any motions or nominations for positions to secretariat.gusserane.wexford@gaa.ie no later than December 19. This year’s meeting may have to be held virtually again, but a final decision on this will be made sooner and will depend on HSE guidelines.

Lotto

There was no Tintern Lotto jackpot winner last week when the numbers drawn were 5, 13, 27 and 28. The winner of match three was Seamus Cullen of Kinnagh who took home € 200.

Christmas market

The Christmas market takes place on Sunday December 5 from 2 to 5 p.m. at St. Mary’s Hall in Fethard on Sea.

Various food and crafts, including wreaths. Reserve your homemade Christmas cake. Check the market’s Facebook page, Fethard on sea Country Market for all dates and information. Buy local !!

Sympathy

Our sincere condolences to Kathleen Corcoran of Nash on the sad passing of her brother Owen O’Connor of Knockea after a courageous battle with illness. Owen was a very popular member of the community and our hearts go out to his wife Marie, sons Niall and David and daughter Therese and brother Robbie.

CHESTNUT

Historical calendar

The historic Horeswood 2022 calendar is now on sale in local stores. It contains nearly 50 photos and extracts from history. It is also available from Tom Grennan, John Flynn or Denis Cadogan. Cost 10 €.

Christmas bakery

The St Louis daycare now takes orders for the Christmas pastry. Order your Mince Pies, Christmas Pudding and Christmas Cakes. The deadline for orders is December 13th. Call 051-389509 or call the Center to place your order.

They will be holding a Christmas bakery fair on Saturday, December 18, 2021 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the nursery. All Covid restrictions will be in place and social distancing will comply with government guidelines.

Christmas craft fair

The Campile room committee is organizing a Christmas craft fair on Sunday December 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eircode Y34DT10 with many superb crafts on offer during the day. We also organize a Christmas raffle in conjunction with our craft fair with a 1st prize of € 200 in cash and a 2nd prize a Christmas basket worth € 100 and many other prizes to be won, tickets are on sale with the members of the committee, drawing lots to take place at the Craft Fair.

Sympathy

The Horeswood GAA club extend their condolences to the O’Connor family, Knockea, on the sad passing of Owen last Wednesday. Owen has shown great commitment to the club as vice president, president on 2 separate occasions, county and district council representative and coach with many teams from Under 12 to Intermediate. His burial took place at Horeswood Cemetery last Friday. Ar dheis Dé go raibh sé.

Racket league

Horeswood Men’s and Women’s Racketball League reached the round of 16 after 7 rounds and the quarter-finals will be played next week.

GRAIGUENAMANAGH

Graig’s Notes

Email news, club events, announcements, and more. for notes to graignotes@outlook.com. The deadline is Thursday 6 p.m.

Parish news

Duiske Abbey returns to its usual opening hours, with weekend mass on Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m. and weekday mass at 10 a.m. except Saturday.

Lotto

The numbers drawn in the Graig GAA and Highview Athletitc lottery draw were 4, 14, 20 and 22, there was no winner. The winners of the € 30 consolation each were Val Lonergan, Marian Ryan, Anna Brown, Liam O’Shea, Louise Doyle. Next week’s jackpot is € 18,250 and the reserve jackpot is € 10,000. Tickets are available from any committee member.

Tidy Towns Jackpot

Results of the week: 1st Prize, Deirdre Butler 346 €. 2nd Prize Ann Foley, Glynn € 50. 3rd Cian Dunne Prize € 25. The draw continues every Thursday at 4 p.m. at the Abbey Center on Convent Lane.

Closing

The local Citizen Information Office recently closed in Graiguenamagh. This is a huge loss for the city and the surrounding neighborhoods after nearly 30 years of service to the people.

It follows the closure of the Bank of Ireland on October 1.

In addition, the public toilets have been closed and removed which is a huge inconvenience for everyone in the city and especially vacationers visiting the city.

Horses race

Local jockey Danny Sheehy rode Kalu Pande for Ray Connlly, coached by Leanne Breen, in second place @ 100/1 in the 4.30 at Dundalk on Wednesday November 24th. It would have been a good bet, especially if he had come first.

Christmas market

A Christmas market will take place on December 4 and 5 in the Abbey Hall, Graiguenamanagh from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

There will be over 30 stalls, art, photography, craft decorations, bags, baby blankets, jams, chutneys and pickles, woodturning, food, beautiful hats , scarves and jewelry, soaps, candles and cosmetics, beeswax candles and ink and handmade prints, candy, candy and baked goods, And much more.

NOVELTY

November monthly raffle

The November parish draw took place last Sunday. The winners will be announced in the notes next week.

Divide the pot

The bi-monthly Split the Pot continues every second Thursday night at Foley’s Bar. The next draw will take place on Thursday, December 2.

Last week’s winner was Amy Keating from Gusserane. She was the lucky winner of 160 €. Congratulations to Amy.

School cleaner

Newbawn National Sacred Heart School is looking for someone who is interested in school cleaning. If you are interested, please email shnsnewbawn@gmail.com for details. Those interested should contact the school before December 3, 2021.

Christmas Split the Pot

A Split the Pot Christmas special is back in operation this year. Tickets cost € 10 and will make a handy Christmas present or stocking filler. The draw will take place right after Christmas and the winning ticket can be up to € 1,000, so register early and buy your ticket as it is a limited draw. Tickets are available at the usual points of sale.

Elderly Christmas Party

Due to the continued presence of COVID 19 still in the community, the parish council has decided to postpone the Christmas party until January / February of next year.

The late Breda stack

Much sadness and regret was caused in and around Newbawn with the death of Breda (née Murphy) Stack. Sympathy extends to her husband Bobby, daughter Sarah, sister Bess Rossiter and brother Eddie Murphy. Breda is predeceased by her sister Molly Dolan and her brother Jack Murphy. His burial took place at Newbawn Cemetery after Requiem Mass in the nearby church last Sunday. May she rest in peace.

RAHEEN

Parish cleaning

Well done and thank you to everyone who volunteered on Saturday November 7th. Everyone had a great day and the place hasn’t been so beautiful in years.

Special mention to Shane McDonald and the parish committee for organizing everything the day and weeks before.

Christmas collection

It is a difficult time of year for many families in our community who are struggling to approach Christmas. We collect non-perishable food, new toys and toiletries. Items can be dropped off at the Parish House or Raheen Daycare every day Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. until the end of November.

Volunteers

We are currently in need of volunteers to help occasionally with our services for the elderly. If you are available, please contact Moira on 051 442888.

Home security tips

It is important to be aware of the safety of the home during the winter months.

Here are some tips to keep you and your belongings safe.

Turn on: If you don’t plan on staying home, use timers or smart plugs on lights to make sure your home is well lit. With darker evenings, the most common time for a break-in is between 5 p.m. and 11 p.m.

Out of Sight: Keep valuables and Christmas gifts away from windows and doors.

Lock all doors: A third of burglars will enter the house through the front door.

Close windows and avoid running electrical cords through cracks in windows.

Do not keep spare keys outside: rather leave them with a trusted neighbor.

Unwanted Visitors: Before answering the door, check for unwanted visitors.

Ask for ID from anyone who asks to enter your home for any type of “maintenance reason”.

If you have an alarm: Remember to activate your alarm when you are not at home.

Men’s shed

The Men’s Shed has kindling available for sale in Raheen every Monday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Source link

]]>
Cards, budget, sports betting :: WRAL.com https://www.learnracquetball.com/cards-budget-sports-betting-wral-com/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/cards-budget-sports-betting-wral-com/

– State lawmakers redesigned the Congressional and Legislative Assembly districts to reflect population changes in last year’s census, but it remains to be seen how long they last before another redesign.

The new cards heavily favor Republican candidates, and they are already being challenged in court. Cards put in place by the GOP-controlled legislature a decade ago have had to undergo several rewrites due to illegal gerrymanders.

We are in November 2021, do you know where your state budget is?

Legislative leaders and Governor Roy Cooper continue to negotiate behind closed doors, but Pro Senate Speaker Tem Phil Berger said this week the two sides were “far from each other.” The House and Senate are taking their recess next week, so it’s clear there won’t be a deal anytime soon.

Berger publicly supported Medicaid’s expansion for the first time, but said there was not enough support elsewhere in the General Assembly for it to be included in a budget deal.

A Senate bill that would legalize, regulate and tax sports betting in North Carolina resurfaced in the House this week after months of sleep. He needs to clear multiple committees before reaching a floor vote, and supporters have said that likely won’t happen until next year.

Source link

]]>
Health clubs want you back. Here is what they offer | Aptitude https://www.learnracquetball.com/health-clubs-want-you-back-here-is-what-they-offer-aptitude/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 11:01:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/health-clubs-want-you-back-here-is-what-they-offer-aptitude/

Health club chains are pedaling hard to bring pandemic-weary consumers back to the gym.

But some of the bigger companies are taking different paths as the industry waits to see if COVID-19 infection rates drop enough to make consumers feel safe to resume group workouts.

The YouFit and Planet Fitness discount chains are expanding into personal advice on fitness, wellness and nutrition. Full-service chain LA Fitness is rebranding some of its locations and offering simple plans to compete with the low membership rates of discount chains.

The movements follow a few painful years for the fitness industry. Quarantine orders intended to stop or slow the spread of COVID-19 in the spring of 2020 have forced the closure of almost all gyms in the country. In some states, they were closed for nine months. Florida gyms were allowed to reopen after just two months, but they faced capacity restrictions and consumer reluctance to expose themselves to potential infection.

Efforts to get back to normalcy last year were hampered by a wave of infections that hit the country over the summer, pushing many gym chains, including YouFit, Gold’s Gym and 24 Hour Fitness, to restructure their debts through bankruptcy.

Vaccinations spiked membership rates in early summer, but fell again as the Delta variant raged across the country in August and September. Since the start of the pandemic, about 22% of all U.S. gyms have closed permanently, according to industry figures.

Now, as infection and hospitalization rates drop again with no known new variants waiting behind the scenes, gym owners are betting consumers are ready to get back in shape. But they also know that the good old days are over.

A “hybrid approach” to physical training is here to stay, says Sami Smith, spokesperson for the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, which has 8,000 members. “Many facilities are ready or preparing to offer virtual or on-demand services over the long term,” she said in an email.

YouFit embraces well-being

They include YouFit Health Clubs, which plans on October 25 to change its name to YouFit Gyms and launch a $ 20 million renovation of its 80 locations in the United States.

The new offerings will include optional personal on-site training, personalized nutritional advice via the EatLove smartphone app and access to virtual in-home classes via a new mobile app called YouFit On Demand.

The company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last year and sold itself to its lenders in exchange for debt forgiveness, is betting its future on the belief that consumers are tired of working out at home and hungry for results that can only be achieved with weights and machines, said Brian Vahaly, who was named CEO in February.

“The big change is that people understand what they can and cannot do at home,” Vahaly said in an interview. The corporate renovation will focus on “more diverse types of cardio training and more diverse types of strength training,” he said.

“Lifting weights is essential for young adults and the elderly. People 50 and older need strength training to maintain bone density, and they need to combine cardio training to keep their hearts and bodies healthy.

YouFit was founded in 2008 by Rick Berks, the creator of Planet Fitness, and both channels have grown with a focus on similar no-frills, non-judgmental philosophies. Distinguishing themselves from the culture of mirror gaze and bulging pecs that characterized chains like Gold’s Gym in the 1980s and 1990s, both channels have emphasized accessibility to all.

Planet Fitness offered its “non-judgmental zone” while YouFit aimed to be “the most welcoming gym in the country”.

What also sets them apart are their prices.

Both channels have seen success by announcing a monthly no-contract membership fee of just $ 10 per month (plus start-up fees, annual fees, cancellation fees, and taxes where applicable), while the larger full-service health clubs commanded rates of $ 30 per month or more and required long-term contracts.

But the low fees bought a no-frills experience. Members had access to bikes, treadmills, weight machines, free weights, a locker room and nothing else.

Vahaly says the narrow options have kept YouFit from becoming more than “a gym and an entry-level product”. He added, “We couldn’t serve people when they got more mature and sophisticated. “

YouFit will still offer a basic monthly subscription of $ 10, while its expanded offerings will continue to be priced below its competitors, he said. Personal training sessions will cost as little as $ 30 compared to $ 45 to $ 75 at other clubs. A $ 24.99 premium membership will get you access to all YouFit facilities, unlimited group exercise classes, half-price drinks, and unlimited guest privileges.

The company’s new YouFit On Demand app, slated to launch on November 15, will cost $ 4.99 as a standalone subscription or as an add-on to basic and premium subscriptions. A $ 39.99 Premium + subscription will include the on-demand app and access to the EatLove nutrition service.

Currently, YouFit clubs are operating at around 80% of their pre-pandemic volume, Vahaly said. Members avoid congestion by spreading their training hours throughout the day.

Planet Fitness’s health strategy

Planet Fitness, one of the world’s largest gym chains with 2,170 locations, is moving towards a health and wellness strategy that it says will resonate as we emerge from the pandemic, said the CEO Chris Rondeau to investors last month.

Consumers “realize that (…) being overweight or in poor shape or not taking care of one’s health is a contributing factor to hospitalization and the proportion of deaths,” he said.

The number of members of the society has increased by 700,000 since April 1. Forty percent are first-time members, he said. “You’re really getting people off the couch for the first time, and these are the people who really need our help. “

Executives at the state-owned company attributed the success to its ‘bricks-and-clicks’ strategy of engaging in-home members with online fitness classes, then convincing them to use the app to upgrade to memberships. in person.

No fees are required to download the app and access a personal fitness tracker and dozens of home workout videos. Once registered, consumers can use the app to purchase a digital-only $ 5.99 subscription that gives them premium content. They can also sign up to access in-person facilities starting at $ 10 per month plus an activation fee of $ 49.

Between 65% and 75% of new members join through the company’s app and website, up from just 30% to 39% in 2019, Rondeau said. “The world has changed,” he says. “And I think it’s something that’s going to stay.”

LA Fitness expands its discount brand

Not to be missed, LA Fitness, a full-service club chain with higher membership fees but more amenities like basketball and racquetball courts, Zumba classes, and swimming pools, has rebranded some of its pitches in Esporta clubs.

The company’s website shows that 41 of LA Fitness’s 108 clubs are now Esporta clubs. As part of the new branding, the company is promoting a monthly single club membership fee of $ 9.99 that matches those of YouFit and Planet Fitness. The catch: Basic members only have access to weight training and cardio equipment. And they have to pay an initiation fee of $ 99. Esporta registrants can avoid the $ 99 fee by opting for a monthly subscription of $ 24.99 which includes use of all facilities, a group training session and a personal training session.

LA Fitness Club memberships, on the other hand, start at $ 35.99 per month to access a single club with no initiation fee, or $ 35.99 per month plus a $ 49 initiation fee for. access all clubs in the state.

All bets are off whether COVID-19 or a new variant returns this winter, Planet Fitness executives said. Members of the industry, meanwhile, are pushing Congress to approve a $ 30 billion relief fund to keep struggling fitness companies afloat. Although introduced in a congressional bill last February, the fund has not been included in the US $ 1.9 trillion bailout package passed last spring, nor in any ongoing spending programs. negotiation this fall.

“During closings, health clubs had to pay their bills in full with little or no income,” said trade association spokeswoman Sami Smith. “As one of the first industries to close and reopen, the fitness industry received no direct relief from Congress.”

Source link

]]>
Health clubs want you back. Here is what they offer | Business https://www.learnracquetball.com/health-clubs-want-you-back-here-is-what-they-offer-business/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/health-clubs-want-you-back-here-is-what-they-offer-business/

Health club chains are pedaling hard to bring pandemic-weary consumers back to the gym.

But some of the bigger companies are taking different paths as the industry waits to see if COVID-19 infection rates drop enough to make consumers feel safe to resume group workouts.

The YouFit and Planet Fitness discount chains are expanding into personal advice on fitness, wellness and nutrition. Full-service chain LA Fitness is rebranding some of its locations and offering simple plans to compete with the low membership rates of discount chains.

The movements follow a few painful years for the fitness industry. Quarantine orders intended to stop or slow the spread of COVID-19 in the spring of 2020 have forced the closure of almost all gyms in the country. In some states, they were closed for nine months. Florida gyms were allowed to reopen after just two months, but they faced capacity restrictions and consumer reluctance to expose themselves to potential infection.

Efforts to get back to normalcy last year were hampered by a wave of infections that hit the country over the summer, pushing many gym chains, including YouFit, Gold’s Gym and 24 Hour Fitness, to restructure their debts through bankruptcy.

Vaccinations spiked membership rates in early summer, but fell again as the Delta variant raged across the country in August and September. Since the start of the pandemic, about 22% of all U.S. gyms have closed permanently, according to industry figures.

Now, as infection and hospitalization rates drop again with no known new variants waiting behind the scenes, gym owners are betting consumers are ready to get back in shape. But they also know that the good old days are over.

A “hybrid approach” to physical training is here to stay, says Sami Smith, spokesperson for the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, which has 8,000 members. “Many facilities are ready or preparing to offer virtual or on-demand services over the long term,” she said in an email.

YouFit embraces well-being

They include YouFit Health Clubs, which plans on October 25 to change its name to YouFit Gyms and launch a $ 20 million renovation of its 80 locations in the United States.

The new offerings will include optional personal on-site training, personalized nutritional advice via the EatLove smartphone app and access to virtual in-home classes via a new mobile app called YouFit On Demand.

The company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last year and sold itself to its lenders in exchange for debt forgiveness, is betting its future on the belief that consumers are tired of working out at home and hungry for results that can only be achieved with weights and machines, said Brian Vahaly, who was named CEO in February.

“The big change is that people understand what they can and cannot do at home,” Vahaly said in an interview. The corporate renovation will focus on “more diverse types of cardio training and more diverse types of strength training,” he said.

“Lifting weights is essential for young adults and the elderly. People 50 and older need strength training to maintain bone density, and they need to combine cardio training to keep their hearts and bodies healthy.

YouFit was founded in 2008 by Rick Berks, the creator of Planet Fitness, and both channels have grown with an emphasis on similar no-frills, non-judgmental philosophies. Distinguishing themselves from the culture of mirror gaze and bulging pecs that characterized chains like Gold’s Gym in the 1980s and 1990s, both channels have emphasized accessibility to all.

Planet Fitness offered its “no judgment zone” while YouFit aimed to be “the most welcoming gym in the country”.

What also sets them apart are their prices.

Both channels have seen success by announcing a monthly no-contract membership fee of just $ 10 per month (plus start-up fees, annual fees, cancellation fees, and taxes where applicable), while large full-service health clubs commanded rates of $ 30 per month or more and required long-term contracts.

But the low fees bought a no-frills experience. Members had access to bikes, treadmills, weight machines, free weights, a locker room and nothing else.

Vahaly says the narrow options have kept YouFit from becoming more than “a gym and an entry-level product”. He added, “We couldn’t serve people when they got more mature and sophisticated. “

YouFit will still offer a basic monthly subscription of $ 10, while its expanded offerings will continue to be priced below its competitors, he said. Personal training sessions will cost as little as $ 30 compared to $ 45 to $ 75 at other clubs. A $ 24.99 premium membership will get you access to all YouFit facilities, unlimited group exercise classes, half-price drinks, and unlimited guest privileges.

The company’s new YouFit On Demand app, slated to launch on November 15, will cost $ 4.99 as a standalone subscription or as an add-on to basic and premium subscriptions. A $ 39.99 Premium + subscription will include the on-demand app and access to the EatLove nutrition service.

Currently, YouFit clubs are operating at around 80% of their pre-pandemic volume, Vahaly said. Members avoid congestion by spreading their training hours throughout the day.

Planet Fitness’s health strategy

Planet Fitness, one of the world’s largest gym chains with 2,170 locations, is moving towards a health and wellness strategy that it says will resonate as we emerge from the pandemic, said the CEO Chris Rondeau to investors last month.

Consumers “are realizing that (…) being overweight or in poor shape or not taking care of your health is a contributing factor to hospitalization and the proportion of deaths,” he said.

The number of members of the society has increased by 700,000 since April 1. Forty percent are first-time members, he said. “You’re really getting people off the couch for the first time, and these are the people who really need our help. “

Executives at the state-owned company attributed the success to its ‘bricks-and-clicks’ strategy of engaging in-home members with online fitness classes, then convincing them to use the app to upgrade to memberships. in person.

No fees are required to download the app and access a personal fitness tracker and dozens of home workout videos. Once registered, consumers can use the app to purchase a digital-only $ 5.99 subscription that gives them premium content. They can also sign up to access in-person facilities starting at $ 10 per month plus an activation fee of $ 49.

Between 65% and 75% of new members join through the company’s app and website, up from just 30% to 39% in 2019, Rondeau said. “The world has changed,” he says. “And I think it’s something that’s going to stay.”

LA Fitness expands its discount brand

Not to be missed, LA Fitness, a full-service club chain with higher membership fees but more amenities like basketball and racquetball courts, Zumba classes, and swimming pools, has rebranded some of its pitches in Esporta clubs.

The company’s website shows that 41 of LA Fitness’s 108 clubs are now Esporta clubs. As part of the new branding, the company is promoting a monthly single club membership fee of $ 9.99 that matches those of YouFit and Planet Fitness. The catch: Basic members only have access to weight training and cardio equipment. And they have to pay an initiation fee of $ 99. Esporta registrants can avoid the $ 99 fee by opting for a monthly subscription of $ 24.99 which includes use of all facilities, a group training session and a personal training session.

LA Fitness Club memberships, on the other hand, start at $ 35.99 per month to access a single club with no initiation fee, or $ 35.99 per month plus a $ 49 initiation fee for. access all clubs in the state.

All bets are off whether COVID-19 or a new variant returns this winter, Planet Fitness executives said. Members of the industry, meanwhile, are pushing Congress to approve a $ 30 billion relief fund to keep struggling fitness companies afloat. Although introduced in a congressional bill last February, the fund has not been included in the US $ 1.9 trillion bailout package passed last spring, nor in any ongoing spending programs. negotiation this fall.

“During closings, health clubs had to pay their bills in full with little or no income,” said trade association spokeswoman Sami Smith. “As one of the first industries to close and reopen, the fitness industry received no direct relief from Congress.”

© 2021 South Florida Sun Sentinel. Visit sun-sentinel.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source link

]]>
What Health Clubs Offer To Attract Customers | Sports https://www.learnracquetball.com/what-health-clubs-offer-to-attract-customers-sports/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 09:15:00 +0000 https://www.learnracquetball.com/what-health-clubs-offer-to-attract-customers-sports/






A notice is posted on the door of a Planet Fitness in May announcing the new mask wearing guidelines




Health club chains are pedaling hard to bring pandemic-weary consumers back to the gym.

But some of the bigger companies are taking different paths as the industry waits to see if COVID-19 infection rates drop enough to make consumers feel safe to resume group workouts.

The YouFit and Planet Fitness discount chains are expanding into personal advice on fitness, wellness and nutrition. Full-service chain LA Fitness is rebranding some of its locations and offering simple plans to compete with the low membership rates of discount chains.

The movements follow a few painful years for the fitness industry.

Quarantine orders intended to stop or slow the spread of COVID-19 in the spring of 2020 have forced the closure of almost all gyms in the country. In some states, they were closed for nine months.

Florida gyms were allowed to reopen after just two months, but they faced capacity restrictions and consumer reluctance to expose themselves to potential infection.

“Hybrid approach”

Efforts to get back to normalcy last year were hampered by a wave of infections that hit the country over the summer, pushing many gym chains, including YouFit, Gold’s Gym and 24 Hour Fitness, to restructure their debts through bankruptcy.

Vaccinations spiked membership rates in early summer, but fell again as the Delta variant raged across the country in August and September. Since the start of the pandemic, about 22% of all U.S. gyms have closed permanently, according to industry figures.

Now, as infection and hospitalization rates drop again with no known new variants waiting behind the scenes, gym owners are betting consumers are ready to get back in shape. But they also know that the good old days are over.

A “hybrid approach” to physical training is here to stay, says Sami Smith, spokesperson for the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, which has 8,000 members. “Many facilities are ready or preparing to offer virtual or on-demand services over the long term,” she said in an email.

They include YouFit Health Clubs, which plans on October 25 to change its name to YouFit Gyms and launch a $ 20 million renovation of its 80 locations in the United States.

YouFit on demand

The new offerings will include optional personal on-site training, personalized nutritional advice via the EatLove smartphone app and access to virtual in-home classes via a new mobile app called YouFit On Demand.

The company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last year and sold itself to its lenders in exchange for debt forgiveness, is betting its future on the belief that consumers are tired of working out at home and hungry for results that can only be achieved with weights and machines, said Brian Vahaly, who was named CEO in February.

“The big change is that people understand what they can and cannot do at home,” Vahaly said in an interview. The corporate renovation will focus on “more diverse types of cardio training and more diverse types of strength training,” he said.

“Lifting weights is essential for young adults and the elderly. People 50 and older need strength training to maintain bone density, and they need to combine cardio training to keep their hearts and bodies healthy.

The cost of getting back into shape

Planet Fitness offered its “no judgment zone” while YouFit aimed to be “the most welcoming gym in the country”.

What also sets them apart are their prices.

Both channels have seen success by announcing a monthly no-contract membership fee of just $ 10 per month (plus start-up fees, annual fees, cancellation fees, and taxes where applicable), while large full-service health clubs commanded rates of $ 30 per month or more and required long-term contracts.

But the low fees bought a no-frills experience. Members had access to bikes, treadmills, weight machines, free weights, a locker room and nothing else.

Vahaly says the narrow options have kept YouFit from becoming more than “a gym and an entry-level product”. He added, “We couldn’t serve people when they got more mature and sophisticated. “

YouFit will still offer a basic monthly subscription of $ 10, while its expanded offerings will continue to be priced below its competitors, he said. Personal training sessions will cost as little as $ 30 compared to $ 45 to $ 75 at other clubs.

A $ 24.99 premium membership will get you access to all YouFit facilities, unlimited group exercise classes, half-price drinks, and unlimited guest privileges.

The company’s new YouFit On Demand app, slated to launch on November 15, will cost $ 4.99 as a standalone subscription or as an add-on to basic and premium subscriptions. A $ 39.99 Premium + subscription will include the on-demand app and access to the EatLove nutrition service.

Planet Fitness’s health strategy

Planet Fitness, one of the world’s largest gym chains with 2,170 locations, is moving towards a health and wellness strategy that it says will resonate as we emerge from the pandemic, said the CEO Chris Rondeau to investors last month.

The number of members of the society has increased by 700,000 since April 1. Forty percent are first-time members, he said. “You’re really getting people off the couch for the first time, and these are the people who really need our help. “

Executives at the state-owned company attributed the success to its ‘bricks-and-clicks’ strategy of engaging in-home members with online fitness classes, then convincing them to use the app to upgrade to memberships. in person.

No fees are required to download the app and access a personal fitness tracker and dozens of home workout videos.

Once registered, consumers can use the app to purchase a digital-only $ 5.99 subscription that gives them premium content. They can also sign up to access in-person facilities starting at $ 10 per month plus an activation fee of $ 49.

Between 65% and 75% of new members join through the company’s app and website, up from just 30% to 39% in 2019, Rondeau said. “The world has changed,” he says. “And I think it’s something that’s going to stay.”

LA Fitness expands its brand

Not to be missed, LA Fitness, a full-service club chain with higher membership fees but more amenities like basketball and racquetball courts, Zumba classes, and swimming pools, has rebranded some of its pitches in Esporta clubs.

The company’s website shows that 41 of LA Fitness’s 108 clubs are now Esporta clubs. As part of the new branding, the company is promoting a monthly single club membership fee of $ 9.99 that matches those of YouFit and Planet Fitness.

The catch: Basic members only have access to weight training and cardio equipment. And they have to pay an initiation fee of $ 99. Esporta registrants can avoid the $ 99 fee by opting for a monthly subscription of $ 24.99 which includes use of all facilities, a group training session and a personal training session.

LA Fitness Club memberships, on the other hand, start at $ 35.99 per month to access a single club with no initiation fee, or $ 35.99 per month plus a $ 49 initiation fee for. access all clubs in the state.

All bets are off whether COVID-19 or a new variant returns this winter, Planet Fitness executives said. Members of the industry, meanwhile, are pushing Congress to approve a $ 30 billion relief fund to keep struggling fitness companies afloat.

Although introduced in a congressional bill last February, the fund has not been included in the US $ 1.9 trillion bailout package passed last spring, nor in any ongoing spending programs. negotiation this fall.

“During closings, health clubs had to pay their bills in full with little or no income,” said trade association spokeswoman Sami Smith. “As one of the first industries to close and reopen, the fitness industry received no direct relief from Congress.”

Source link

]]>